English Literature Grade 7

Overview

The English Syllabus at GEMS Wesgreen International Lower Secondary School aims to produce students who are fluent readers with habitual desire for extensive reading, leading to their acquisition of a wide range of vocabulary, and building of a strong foundation in grammar rules and linguistic conventions. The aim also supports our students to hone their reading and vocabulary skills via meaningful discussions and engaging writing activities.

Learning Outcomes

With reference to Key Stage 3 English programme of the National Curriculum in England, the overarching aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment.

The aims of the English Syllabus are to encourage and enable students to:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding.
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information.
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language.
  • appreciate rich and varied literary heritages.
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences.
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas.
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

Ongoing Objectives

The following objectives are covered and built upon throughout each work unit.

Spoken Language

  • Speak confidently and effectively, including through:
  • using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion.
  • giving short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point.
  • participating in formal debates and structured discussions, summarising and/or building on what has been said.
  • improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate. language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Reading

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently through reading a wide range of fiction and non-fiction, including in particular whole books, short stories, poems and plays with a wide coverage of genres, historical periods, forms and authors. The range will include high-quality works from:
  1. English literature, both pre-1914 and contemporary, including prose and poetry.
  2. seminal world literature.
  3. choosing and reading books independently for challenge, interest and enjoyment.
  4. re-reading books encountered earlier to increase familiarity with them and provide a basis for making comparisons.

Understand increasingly challenging texts through:

  • learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries.
  • making inferences and referring to evidence in the text.
  • knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • checking their understanding to make sure that what

Read critically through:

  • knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning.
  • recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used.
  • studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and their effects .
  • understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play,
  • making critical comparisons across texts,
  • studying a range of authors, including at least two authors in depth each year.

Writing

Pupils should be taught to:

  • write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information through:
  • writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences, including:
  • well-structured formal expository and narrative essays
  • stories, scripts, poetry and other imaginative writing
  • notes and polished scripts for talks and presentations
  • a range of other narrative and non-narrative texts, including arguments, and personal and formal letters
  • summarising and organising material, and supporting ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail
  • applying their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form
  • drawing on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing
  • plan, draft, edit and proof-read through:
  • considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended
  • amending the vocabulary, grammar and structure of their writing to improve its coherence and overall effectiveness
  • paying attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling; applying the spelling patterns and rules for KS3 programmes of study for English.

Grammar and vocabulary

Pupils should be taught to:

  • consolidate and build on their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary through:
  • extending and applying the grammatical knowledge for KS3 programmes of study to analyse more challenging texts
  • studying the effectiveness and impact of the grammatical features of the texts they read
  • drawing on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects
  • knowing and understanding the differences between spoken and written language, including differences associated with formal and informal registers, and between Standard English and other varieties of English
  • using Standard English confidently in their own writing and speech

Literature Genre Overview

Term 1

POETRY

Approximate length: 12 Weeks

In this genre, the children will explore different poetic devices, forms of poetry and study some pre-1914 century poems such as the Pied Piper of Hamelin and The Highwayman.

Specific National Curriculum Objectives Covered:

  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language.
  • drawing on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects.
  • applying their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form.
  • making inferences and referring to evidence in the text.
  • knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.
  • studying a range of authors, including at least two authors in depth each year.
  • read critically through recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used.
  • improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Term 2

Prose – Novel After Tomorrow by Gillian Cross

Approximate length: 14 weeks

In this genre, the students will explore various global issues such as racism, refugees, economic depression, survival famine and other medical conditions such as PTSD, dementia etc. via the text After Tomorrow by Gillian Cross. The novel projects world issues through the eye of the protagonist, Matty and his family, who escape from England to France for a better life as a result of the unexpected crash of 5 banks at once in England. This, the author terms, THE AMMAGEDON. The students are also able to explore major elements of fiction and their significance as presented by the author.

Specific National Curriculum Objectives Covered:

  • participating in formal debates and structured discussions, summarising and/or building on what has been said.
  • improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.
  • knowing and understanding the differences between spoken and written language, including differences associated with formal and informal registers, and between Standard English and other varieties of English.
  • using Standard English confidently in their own writing and speech.
  • drawing on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing.
  • critical reading through studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these.
  • read critically to know how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning.
  • learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries.
  • making inferences and referring to evidence in the text.
  • knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.

Term 3

Prose -Short Stories Don’t Make Me Laugh by David Kitchen

Approximate length: 13 weeks

In this genre, the students explore differences between novel, novella, novelette, flash fiction and short story. They afterwards read different short stories contained in the book, relating them to real life as they explore elements of fiction and their significance as presented by various authors of the short stories.

Specific National Curriculum Objectives Covered:

  • using Standard English confidently in their own writing and speech.
  • drawing on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing.
  • critical reading through studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these.
  • read critically to know how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning.
  • learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries.
  • making inferences and referring to evidence in the text.
  • knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.

Assessment

Baseline Test: At the beginning of the academic year, the students write an internal and standardized baseline test, which is used to measure progress.

Formative: Throughout the terms, students will complete graded quizzes, tests, projects, speaking ad listening activities. This allows the teacher to assess the students’ attainment and inform their planning.

Summative: At the end of each term, we complete internal and standardized tests. This allows us to measure the students’ progress throughout the term and year. At the end of the academic year, the students complete the standardized GL and NGRT assessment.

Action for blended learning

Here at Wesgreen we are using multiple teaching methods in order to help our students learn more effectively and creatively. This will include a combination of traditional classroom instruction and digital learning, such as:

  • Bluetooth microphones to enable remote students to hear more clearly during lessons.
  • The use of different types of instructional materials, such as videos.
  • Incorporating different means of technology (Phoenix Classroom).
  • Varied online assessment methods (Microsoft forms, Kahoot, One Note).

Next Steps

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